What is AMD?

Macular Degeneration is currently the leading cause of vision loss in the United States, affecting more than 10 million Americans. Macular degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central part of the retina, known as the macula. The macula helps focus central vision in the eye, and helps us to read, recognize faces, or see other detailed objects.

 

In some individuals AMD can advance so slowly that it is not obvious the disease is present until vision loss occurs, sometimes far later.

Types of Macular Degeneration

There are two kinds of macular degeneration: "wet" and "dry." Most cases (over 80%) are of the dry type, while the rest are wet.

Dry Macular Degeneration (by far the most common), is characterized by the formation of drusen, which are small yellow deposits, under the macula. This thins the macula, drying it out, and causing the macula to lose its function. Most people over the age of 50 have at least one of these yellow deposits in their eyes. Note that only eyes with large drusen are at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Dry macular degeneration causes loss of central vision. There is no cure for dry AMD, as of yet.

Wet Macular Degeneration is less common, but potentially much more serious. Wet AMD is characterized by the growth of new, abnormal blood vessels under the retina. These vessels can leak blood (or other fluids) which causes damage to the macula. Vision loss from wet AMD is much faster than dry AMD. Many people with wet AMD do not realize they have a problem until it is too late. This is one of the reasons why it is important to regularly visit your ophthalmologist, who can look for early warning signs of AMD.

Who is at risk?

There are a number of risk factors for AMD. Age is a large factor, with the disease most likely to occur after age 60, but it can occur earlier. Other risk factors for AMD are:

 

  • Smoking (research shows that smoking can greatly increase your risk of AMD)
  • Race (research shows that AMD is more common among Caucasians than African-Americans or Hispanics)
  • Family history (research shows that people with a family history of AMD are at a higher risk)

Prevention

We know from a study called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDs) that a combination of vitamins sold over the counter helps prevent progression of AMD. Together, lifestyle changes such as healthy eating habits of fruits and vegetables of all different colors, exercise, smoking cessation, UV protection, and taking AREDs vitamins, could all reduce the number of patients suffering from blindness due to AMD. Visit our offers page to get promotions and find ways to live better and healthier, while decreasing the progression of macular degeneration. Let's get started!

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional

medical advice. Always seek the advice of  your physician or other qualified health care provider.

© Eye Consultants of Atlanta 2017. All rights reserved.

What is AMD?

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the U.S., affecting about 2.1% of Americans 50 years of age or older. In 2010, there were 2.07 million Americans with advanced AMD, and the number is expected to grow to 5.44 million by 2050. AMD is deterioration of the cells in the central portion of the retina, called the macula. The eye is similar to a camera, and the retina is equivalent to the “film” of the camera. This macula helps us read up-close and see things in the distance in the center. It is a potentially blinding disease, but it does not have to be.

Types of Macular Degeneration

There are two kinds of macular degeneration: "wet" and "dry." Most cases (over 80%) are of the dry type, while the rest are wet.

Dry Macular Degeneration (by far the most common), is characterized by the formation of drusen, which are small yellow deposits, under the macula. This thins the macula, drying it out, and causing the macula to lose its function. Most people over the age of 50 have at least one of these yellow deposits in their eyes. Note that only eyes with large drusen are at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Dry macular degeneration causes loss of central vision. There is no cure for dry AMD, as of yet.

Wet Macular Degeneration is less common, but potentially much more serious. Wet AMD is characterized by the growth of new, abnormal blood vessels under the retina. These vessels can leak blood (or other fluids) which causes damage to the macula. Vision loss from wet AMD is much faster than dry AMD. Many people with wet AMD do not realize they have a problem until it is too late. This is one of the reasons why it is important to regularly visit your ophthalmologist, who can look for early warning signs of AMD.

Who is at risk?

There are a number of risk factors for AMD. Age is a large factor, with the disease most likely to occur after age 60, but it can occur earlier. Other risk factors for AMD are:

 

  • Smoking (research shows that smoking can greatly increase your risk of AMD)
  • Race (AMD is more common among Caucasians than African-Americans or Hispanics)
  • Family history (research shows that people with a family history of AMD are at a higher risk)

Prevention

We know from a study called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDs) that a combination of vitamins sold over the counter helps prevent progression of AMD. Together, lifestyle changes such as healthy eating habits of fruits and vegetables of all different colors, exercise, smoking cessation, UV protection, and taking AREDs vitamins, could all reduce the number of patients suffering from blindness due to AMD. Visit our offers page to get promotions and find ways to live better and healthier, while decreasing the progression of macular degeneration. Let's get started!

The material on this site is for informational purposes and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of  your qualified health care provider.

© Eye Consultants of Atlanta 2017. All rights reserved.

What is AMD?

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the U.S., affecting about 2.1% of Americans 50 years of age or older. In 2010, there were 2.07 million Americans with advanced AMD, and the number is expected to grow to 5.44 million by 2050. AMD is deterioration of the cells in the central portion of the retina, called the macula. The eye is similar to a camera, and the retina is equivalent to the “film” of the camera. This macula helps us read up-close and see things in the distance in the center. It is a potentially blinding disease, but it does not have to be.

Types of Macular Degeneration

There are two kinds of macular degeneration: "wet" and "dry." Most cases (over 80%) are of the dry type, while the rest are wet.

Dry Macular Degeneration (by far the most common), is characterized by the formation of drusen, which are small yellow deposits, under the macula. This thins the macula, drying it out, and causing the macula to lose its function. Most people over the age of 50 have at least one of these yellow deposits in their eyes. Note that only eyes with large drusen are at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Dry macular degeneration causes loss of central vision. There is no cure for dry AMD, as of yet.

Prevention

We know from a study called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDs) that a combination of vitamins sold over the counter helps prevent progression of AMD. Together, lifestyle changes such as healthy eating habits of fruits and vegetables of all different colors, exercise, smoking cessation, UV protection, and taking AREDs vitamins, could all reduce the number of patients suffering from blindness due to AMD. Visit our offers page to get promotions and find ways to live better and healthier, while decreasing the progression of macular degeneration. Let's get started!

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of  your physician or other qualified health care provider.

© Eye Consultants of Atlanta 2017. All rights reserved.

What is AMD?

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the U.S., affecting about 2.1% of Americans 50 years of age or older. In 2010, there were 2.07 million Americans with advanced AMD, and the number is expected to grow to 5.44 million by 2050. AMD is deterioration of the cells in the central portion of the retina, called the macula. The eye is similar to a camera, and the retina is equivalent to the “film” of the camera. This macula helps us read up-close and see things in the distance in the center. It is a potentially blinding disease, but it does not have to be.

Types of Macular Degeneration

There are two kinds of macular degeneration: "wet" and "dry." Most cases (over 80%) are of the dry type, while the rest are wet.

Dry Macular Degeneration (by far the most common), is characterized by the formation of drusen, which are small yellow deposits, under the macula. This thins the macula, drying it out, and causing the macula to lose its function. Most people over the age of 50 have at least one of these yellow deposits in their eyes. Note that only eyes with large drusen are at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Dry macular degeneration causes loss of central vision. There is no cure for dry AMD, as of yet.

Types of Macular Degeneration

There are two kinds of macular degeneration: "wet" and "dry." Most cases (over 80%) are of the dry type, while the rest are wet.

Dry Macular Degeneration (by far the most common), is characterized by the formation of drusen, which are small yellow deposits, under the macula. This thins the macula, drying it out, and causing the macula to lose its function. Most people over the age of 50 have at least one of these yellow deposits in their eyes. Note that only eyes with large drusen are at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Dry macular degeneration causes loss of central vision. There is no cure for dry AMD, as of yet.

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider.

© Eye Consultants of Atlanta 2017. All rights reserved.